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Additional Lessons 41 - 50 of 75 for Sherlock Holmes
  41.   Does Order Really Matter ???
...d Order." You will see a man standing in front of an assembly line. Provide your students with a Focus for Media Interaction by asking them to read the questions on the board and/or overhead and to be prepared to answer them at the end of the segment. Question 1: The man on the video mentioned that Sherlock Holmes wins because he understands something that we take for granted in our everyday lives. What was he referring to? (Doing things in the correct order.) Question 2: Based on this video, what do you think our lesson is going to involve? (Order of operations or putting things in order) Question 3: What is another examp...
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    Grade Level: K-12

  42.   SHORT STORY UNIT PLAN
#1173. SHORT STORY UNIT PLAN Literature, level: Senior Posted Fri Jul 16 21:15:22 PDT 1999 by Alyson Schenker (bigfatslob@prodigy.net). Alyson's Educational Home Page Deerfield Beach High School, Derrfield Beach, USA Materials Required: Sherlock Holmes stories - see below Activity Time: One Week Unit Plan Concepts Taught: elements of plot, narration, presentation, et al. short UNIT PLAN: SHORT STORIESface="Arial"> by Alyson Schenker-Deerfield Beach High School DAY 1 Analysis: 10th grade Language Arts class Unit Connection to previous lessons: Students have just...
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    Grade Level: 9-12

  43.   Investigating Genre: The Case of the Classic Detective Story
...from their peers. Have students write a reflective piece that highlights the intentions behind their mystery's adherence to and deviation from the expectations for the genre. back to top EXTENSIONS After students write and share their updated mysteries, have students view the new interpretation of Sherlock Holmes set in modern London and utilizing tools such as the Internet and cell phones (PBS Masterpiece, fall 2010). After investigating the subgenre of classic detective fiction, allow students to choose another subgenre within mystery * or another genre entirely * to explore. Students can record their mysteries, add mus...
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    Grade Level: 9-12

  44.   Exploring the Subtext Strategy: Thinking Beyond the Text
...are. Students then take turns telling their subtext aloud. Below is an example from the second page of the story using three students to play Alexander, Anthony, and Nick: Anthony: Wow! I'm going to test this out on the new racetrack I constructed! I bet it's the fastest car yet! Nick: Cool! I bet Sherlock Holmes had one of these! I bet I can solve a lot of mysteries with this! Alexander: This is the worst day ever. My brothers always get everything just because they're older! I wish I was as old as them. 7. Continue with the story in this way. Try to give as many students as possible the opportunity to act out a subtext....
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    Grade Level: K-5

  45.   Book Report Alternative: Creating a Childhood for a Character
...te a text set, as described in An Exploration of Text Sets: Supporting All Readers of books related to the Arthurian legend. This booklist from Kidsreads.com offers information about several books related to this topic. As an alternate introduction or follow-up, view and discuss the 1985 film Young Sherlock Holmes, which invents a childhood for Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's well-known detective. Have students use the Profile Publisher to create a profile for their character at a specific point in his or her childhood. back to top STUDENT ASSESSMENT/REFLECTIONS Observe students as they work in small groups and as they share thei...
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    Grade Level: 6-8

  46.   One Step at a Time
...nvironmental or other science problem. You could also collaborate with a science teacher to have students apply Polya's procedure to problems from their science class. Have students discuss how the protagonist of a novel or short story uses Polya's steps to solve a problem. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes character is an excellent example. Have students practice metacognition by documenting their thought processes while playing games on the website for Calculation Nation . The game Factor Dazzle works particularly well for this. Students should play a game first to understand the rules, and then use metacognition...
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    Grade Level: 9-12

  47.   Caesar Cipher
...aesar cipher and any shift they choose and give the ciphertext to a classmate. The student receiving the ciphertext should decode the message and be able to tell what shift was used. Extensions Have students use frequency analysis to decode the secret messages in The Adventure of the Dancing Men, a Sherlock Holmes mystery by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Codes used in The Adventure of the Dancing Men Working with the English or Language Arts teacher, you may want to have students read the entire story. The Adventures of the Dancing Men, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Teacher Reflection Were students able to use the letter frequencies...
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    Grade Level: 9-12

  48.   Word Play Fun... Not Your Ordinary Literary Masterpiece!
...characteristics, and habitats, taking notes, then writing 3-5 paragraphs, employing an effective beginning and a logical ending. The student completes the teacher-prepared WebQuest based upon Doyle's Hound of the Baskervilles (10 queries) and locates two forms of word play used in Doyle's Detective Sherlock Holmes' work. The student consults the Teacher Curriculum Page (Doyle's website) or peruses the library copy of the work in order to find the correct answers. The student describes in their own words what a real "private eye" does, listing characteristics needed to be an effective P.I. Challenge: Do you think a real P.I...
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    Grade Level: 3-5

  49.   Trash to Treasure
...force the lesson. * Directions will be read out loud before the students break up into groups. Extensions (For Gifted Students): Students will be allowed to use the library to extend their learning on any topic that interest them. Possible Connections To Other Subjects: The English class can read a Sherlock Holmes or any mystery book. Personal Note: I have used this activity for many years with different classes. I do not place specific evidence that would lead to a specific crime in each bag. I allow the students to use their imagination. Every group has found evidence to support a crime! Different classes will look at th...
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    Grade Level: K-12

  50.   Print vs. Digital: Analyzing and Designing Book Apps for Works of Literature
...the material, or are they distracting? Help students distinguish among apps created for illustrated children's books, which are among the most popular book apps; apps for comic books or graphic novels; and non-illustrated works for more mature readers, like the poems and plays of Shakespeare or the Sherlock Holmes collection. Talk about how these would lend themselves to very different kinds of apps, connecting back to the lists you already have on the board and to the models, if you so choose. Then, tell students they will be working together in small groups to develop an app for a book they are reading or recently read a...
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    Grade Level: K-12


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