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Additional Lessons 1 - 10 of 18 for Homo Erectus
  1.   Investigating Our Past: Where Did Humans Come From?
...se conditions and to write one or two sentences explaining the ways in which each condition either facilitates or hinders the evolutionary process. 4. By studying fossil evidence, paleoanthropologists learn about how each of the four conditions discussed above affected the following hominid groups: Homo erectus , Neanderthal, and Homo sapiens. (The term "groups" is used rather than "species" because there is some debate over whether Neanderthal was in fact a distinct species.) Have students research these three hominid groups using either print resources or the Web sites listed below. Students should also note the loca...
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    Grade Level: 9-12

  2.   Replacing Missing Links in the Evolutionary Chain
...olution of hominids. Author(s): Alison Zimbalist, The New York Times Learning Network Suggested Time Allowance: 45 minutes- 1 hour Objectives: Students will: 1. Define evolution and express what they do and do not believe about the evolution of humans. 2. Explore the recent findings suggesting that Homo sapiens and Neanderthals interbred by reading and discussing "Discovery Suggests Humans Are a Bit Neanderthal." 3. Examine, in small groups, the physical characteristics, location, time period, and aspects of daily life known about one of the ten "stages" of hominids, from the earliest type that lived about 4.5 million...
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    Grade Level: 6-12

  3.   Paleo-what? The Life and Work of Emerging Explorer Zeray Alemseged
...Becoming Human (Macromedia Flash Player required). Visit the Evidence section: Related Exhibit #3, "Explore a dig." What geographic tools and techniques do paleoscientists use to help find and keep track of specimens in the field? Analyzing Evidence What non-human animal is the closest relative of Homo sapiens? What does it mean to say that we are "related?" Where is Laetoli? What is the significance of the Laetoli footprints? Students may refer to the PBS Riddle of the Bones site, showing the locations of Hadar and Laetoli. To navigate through the shockwave site, click "Are they all the same species," then "Learn mor...
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    Grade Level: 9-12

  4.   The Genographic Project: Working with the Genographic Project Public Participation Kit Data
...s that the Genographic Project is involved in collecting samples of DNA not only from specific groups of people who have lived in relative isolation but also from the general public. All human beings carry within them genetic information that can be used to help complete the picture not only of how Homo sapiens came to populate the world but also of why there is so much variation in our physical appearance. Optional: If you have the Genographic Project Public Participation Kit, watch both the Introduction and DNA Collection Method chapters of the multimedia DVD as a class. Direct students to The Genographic Project's W...
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    Grade Level: 9-12

  5.   Hominoid Cranium Comparison
...emale are ideal. A modern human skull may be available from the skeleton standing in the corner of your lab, but, if not, the 25,000 year old Predmost fossil cast will serve, as well. MATERIALS 2. Plastic casts of a Neandertal (50-60,000 year old La Chapelle is commonly available), 450,000 year old Homo erectus ("Peking" is the most widely available and least expensive) and an australopithecine (preferably the "robust" 1.8 million year old Olduvai number 5 or "Zinjanthropus") as an example of an early hominin form that shows a "mosaic" mixture of ape- like and human-like features). These casts are commercially availabl...
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    Grade Level: K-12

  6.   Human Development
...lays (pieces of roll paper or poster Social Science board, magazines for cutting, scissors, glue, markers). Steps/Activities by student(s): _ Primary Level 1. Use the Student Resource Center database to research the species listed below: Black History 1. Australopithecus Afarensis Month 2. Bosei 3. Homo Habilis 4. Homo Ergastor 5. Homo Erectus 6. Heidelberg Man 7. Neanderthal Constitution Day 8. Homo Sapien 2. For each specie the group should locate the following information: Earth Day 1. Approximate year of emergence 2. Physical Features 3. Fossils discovered (place, time discovered, by who) 4. Lifestyle _ Curriculum...
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    Grade Level: 9-12

  7.   Too Good to be True - Science Frauds
...cket, or trouser turnup or whatever. So someone had the knowledge to say: how much of a rhino tooth do I need to show it is a rhino?" says Stringer. There have been several scandals involving planted evidence. Fossil fraud is a lucrative business. "We get people coming into the museum with supposed Homo erectus skulls they have bought from a trader in Java. They are carved out of fossil elephant bones, and they are beautifully done. People carve them and sell them for $500, and we have to say: it is a fake, I am sorry." 2. The amazing Tasaday tribe In 1971 Manuel Elizalde, a Philippine government minister, discovered a...
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    Grade Level: 9-12

  8.   What is Cultural Evolution?
...modern humans (Sections 3.3.12.D & 3.3.10.D of Pennsylvania's Academic Standards for Science and Technology) I usually teach genetics first, then evolution, ending with human evolution. Cultural Evolution is merely toward the end of human evolution. PowerPoint presentations: 1. Australopithicus to Homo erectus 2. Homo erectus to Neandertal to Homo sapiens 3. Cultural Evolution-Feats of Clay This lesson plan is using PowerPoint #3 (a 45 minute period) and will be followed the next day by a 45-minute lab where students will make coil-built pottery for themselves. Suggested Level: This can be used in 9th to 12th Grade B...
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    Grade Level: 9-12

  9.   Roots: The Ancestry of Modern People
...some conditions facilitate speciation and evolution * learn how evolutionary models are formed and evaluated * understand classification and nomenclature of hominid species Key Words Include: anatomy, archaeology, artifacts, dispersal, DNA, Eurasia, fossil, gene flow, geographic isolation, hominid, Homo sapiens, human evolution, human species, migration, mitochondrial DNA, natural selection, neurology, paleoanthropology, prehistoric data, scientific model, speciation, Stone Age Preparation Article Discussion: * Distribute or ask students to download and read the article by Donald Johanson, Ph.D. at http://www.actionbi...
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    Grade Level: 9-12

  10.   Toward Civilization
...ievements, including the construction of pyramids and temples and the development of one of the first systems of writing. civilization DefinitionA high level of social development characterized by cultural and technological advances and an organized system of communication ContextWhile the world of Homo erectus was primitive compared to ours, these early humans, nonetheless, did create a culture with many of the characteristics of a civilization. Homo erectus DefinitionEarly humans who lived from 1,600,000 B.C. to about 300,000 B.C. and were the first to stand upright and use tools and fire ContextFor Homo erectus , th...
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    Grade Level: 9-12


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