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Additional Lessons 11 - 20 of 102 for Jurassic
  11.   Looking Out is Looking Back
...cts, at all sorts of distances, between a few light-minutes and billions of light-years. They will be able to find events in the history of Earth between about 4.5 billion years ago and the present. For example, + The oldest mineral is dated at 4.2 billion years zircons from western Australia + The Jurassic Period 208 to 146 Million Years Ago + Saint Joan of Arc, Patron Saint of France born 01/06/1412; died 05/30/1431. For objects that are further away than 4.5 billion light-years, the Earth will not make a viable reference point ...since it will not yet have formed! It is an amazing concept to grasp that we...
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    Grade Level: 9-12

  12.   Geologic Time When Was Coal Formed?
...eriod Length in years Length on tape Major Events Precambrian Total Length 4 billion Cambriam 70 million Ordovician 70 million Silurian 35 million Paleozoic Devonian 50 million Mississippian 25 million Pennsylvanian 40 million Permian 55 million Total Length 354 million Triassic 35 million Mesozoic Jurassic 54 million Cretaceous 71 million Total Length 160 million Cenozoic Tertiary 63 million Quarternary ======== Activity developed by: Beverly Bowers, Mannington Middle School, Fairmont, West Virginia and the American Coal Foundation
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    Grade Level: 6-8

  13.   What is Cultural Evolution?
...tute of Human Origins (ASU) Human Evolution in 3-D (UCSB) Leakey Ancestors The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites Top Sci/Tech stories now: UK fears climate talks may fail Ancient crustacean raises new questions Pneumonia bug decoded Researchers have hot expectations Jurassic chicken '50-100 years off' FBI arrests alleged copyright cracker Microsoft revamps Hotmail Banana targeted by code crackers Scientists are struggling to sort the relationships between their diverse collection of hominids (species of bipeds that are more closely related to humans than to apes). Until fairl...
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    Grade Level: 9-12

  14.   Be a Fossil Detective
...ining dry sand about 30 cm deep. Cretaceous index fossils (e.g., Exogyra). Small fossils to be kept by students (especially shark's teeth). Large poster-sized geologic time scale (periods should be labelled with appropriate epithets, e.g., "Time of Trilobites" for Cambrian; "Age of Apatosaurus" for Jurassic, etc.). Typical index fossils should be attached next to each period. Series of hand samples on display documenting formation of fossiliferous rock from break down of igneous rocks to sediment to sedimentary rock. Series of hand samples on display showing evolution of life through time, from stromatolites...
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    Grade Level: K-2

  15.   Sea Floor Spreading
...h are older than they should be. Because students will have calculated different spreading rates, the calculated times of opening of the North Atlantic Ocean will vary as well. In general, these dates should cluster around 190 to 220 million years ago, around the time of the Late Triassic and Early Jurassic periods. Certain geologic features in eastern North America are related to the initial "pulling apart" of the continent of Pangea. These include: 1) the Triassic Basins of Gettysburg, PA, and Richmond and Danville, VA, 2) the Palisades of NJ and NY, and 3) the Connecticut Valley of CT and MA. Students who...
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    Grade Level: 6-12

  16.   Cell Types
...e best facilitated via the use of concept maps or Venn diagrams. Students will need the Venn diagrams or the concept maps to develop their characters. 2. Examples of cartoon characters which represent other objects may help students understand their task. Common characters may include Mr. DNA (from Jurassic Park), The Scrubbing Bubble or any others that you may consider. 3. Before developing cell characters, develop a simple cartoon character which represents something easy to understand. An example would be the development of a pen and pencil set of cartoon characters which compares and contrasts the two ute...
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    Grade Level: 6-8

  17.   A Relief Sculpture of Dinosaur Bones
...rmous creatures lived. Dinosaurs were the most successful animals to walk on this planet, dominating the earth for approximately 120 million years. Discuss the work of archeologists and paleontologists and what makes them different. Introduce students to the different dinosaur periods - cretaceous, jurassic, and triassic. Show drawings and photographs of different dinosaurs. Ask students to share the resources and information they have with the class. Discuss with students how the dinosaurs became extinct, how they fell, and how their bones have been preserved to be found millions of years later. 3. Present a...
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    Grade Level: K-5

  18.   Dinosaurs
...VITY #6: THE MESOZOIC ERA Dinosaurs where found to exist in the Mesozoic Era. Visit the "Introduction to the Mesozoic Era" Web page to learn more about this period in history at: http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/mesozoic/mesozoic.html. 1. What three time periods make up the Mesozoic Era? 2. Outline the Jurassic period in detail. 3. Create a pictorial timeline for the Mesozoic Era. ACTIVITY #7: THERE GOES THAT DINOSAUR! Through the ages, there have been many theories on what happened to the dinosaurs. Explore the two theories of dinosaur extinction, "asteroid-impact" versus "volcano-greenhouse" theory at the "Dino...
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    Grade Level: 3-8

  19.   Dinosaurs are Dino-mite!
...eacher: Create a dinosaur timeline with string. Set a scale for your classroom, 1 inch = 1 million years. Tack it to a wall in your classroom. (It should stretch about 18 feet across.) Measure and label the string to show the Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic eras. Then do the same for the Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous periods. Have students make pictures of their favorite dinosaurs and tape them to the appropriate era. Label the dinosaurs as well. * Teacher: Create a dinosaur environment. Choose a dinosaur period for each group of four students. Each group will conduct research to learn which dinosaurs li...
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    Grade Level: 3-8

  20.   Dinosaurs Are Dino-mite!
...eacher: Create a dinosaur timeline with string. Set a scale for your classroom, 1 inch = 1 million years. Tack it to a wall in your classroom. (It should stretch about 18 feet across.) Measure and label the string to show the Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic eras. Then do the same for the Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous periods. Have students make pictures of their favorite dinosaurs and tape them to the appropriate era. Label the dinosaurs as well. * Teacher: Create a dinosaur environment. Choose a dinosaur period for each group of four students. Each group will conduct research to learn which dinosaurs li...
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    Grade Level: K-5


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