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Additional Lessons 31 - 40 of 1000 for Core Values
  31.   Would You Have Helped Out?
...dangers they would face, the specific things they might do to help, and the personal rewards they would receive if they chose to help. Extending the Lesson: Have students research the role of the Quakers in facilitating the Underground Railroad. Ask them to find out who the Quakers are, what their core values are, and how those values led many of them to actively assist escaping slaves. They can begin their research into Quaker values by reading the mission statement of the American Friends Service Committee (a nonprofit organization that takes its goals from traditional Quaker values). Related Links: National Geo...
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    Grade Level: 6-8

  32.   Wherefore Art Thou, Art?
...article, have your secretary write that argument in the appropriate column on the sheet, as well as who is stating or supporting this argument. It will be easiest for you if you read a paragraph or two and then discuss them, then make suggestions for your group's paper. After finishing reading and evaluating the article (approximately 15 minutes), have students move desks in a circle and ask them to share their recordings with the class. Create two similar columns on the board to note students' responses. Then, ask students to share their opinions of the "Sensation" exhibit, including how one determines what can be...
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    Grade Level: 6-12

  33.   Economic Systems
_ _ _ _ Lesson 2 Economic Systems "Students should learn about alternatives to the market system, such as traditional and command economies . . . (they) should study the strengths and weaknesses of each society and its values regarding the objectives of an economic system." ASSUMPTION: Understanding the core values and assumptions of other economies, as well as our own, contributes to the goal of developing cultural literacy. It also stimulates the imagination and fosters experimentation, helping students envision how an economy could...
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    Grade Level: 9-12

  34.   Creating a Heroic Character
...directions might include: + Name your hero (first, middle, last name). + Decide on a specific date and place for your hero's birth. (By specifying a particular era or location, students can work with a variety of multicultural themes.) + Describe the circumstances of your hero's birth. + What is a core value of your character? + Is your character religious or spiritual? + What is your character's highest level of education? + Describe some treasured memorabilia your character possesses. + Recall a traumatic event from your hero's early childhood and tell what happened. + Envision then describe your hero making som...
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    Grade Level: 9-12

  35.   We Shall Overcome
...s, themes, developments, and turning points in the history of the United States and New York. Intermediate 1. The study of New York and United States history requires an analysis of the development of American culture, its diversity and multicultural context, and the ways people are unified by many values, practices, and traditions. Students: Explore the meaning of American culture by identifying the key ideas, beliefs, and patterns of behavior, and traditions that help define it and unite all Americans. Interpret the ideas, values, and beliefs contained in the Declaration of Independence and the New York State Con...
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    Grade Level: 3-8

  36.   The Science of Mummies
...tinction when they offer related ideas. Do their answers fit the research pattern - do they view science mostly as helping society and technology mostly as hurting society? Remind students that scientific thought has evolved over centuries, and that, today, its foundation still rests on traditional core values like "evidence, logic, and good arguments." Tell students that scientists are forever charged with the responsibility to move scientific understanding forward, sometimes updating or disproving old theories and sometimes making striking discoveries by luck, chance, or by using an informed imagination. Begin a...
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    Grade Level: 9-12

  37.   Character Study
Overview of Lesson Plan: In this lesson, students will consider and create collages about the values and morals they believe a political leader should possess. They then interview voters to discover the characteristics they seek in their leaders, and write newspaper articles reflecting their findings. Author(s): Michelle Sale, The New York Times Learning Network Andrea Perelman, The Bank Street College of Educati...
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    Grade Level: 6-12

  38.   Painting Inside the Lines
...Students should share their reactions in a future class. Further Questions for Discussion: - What is modern art? - How might "freedom of expression" affect a public museum differently from a privately-owned institution? - How does religion influence art? - What role does religion play in society? Evaluation / Assessment: Students will be evaluated based on initial journal responses, thoughtful participation in class discussions and roundtable activity, and well-explained reaction papers. Vocabulary: provocative, defacing, hooliganism, denounced, dissident, vigil, furor, thrust, ideology, atheism, conservatives, cu...
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    Grade Level: 6-12

  39.   Burning Hatred
...burning cross or other symbolic gestures that made you question the extent of the right to freedom of speech? - Do you think the history of cross burning should influence whether or not people can do it today? - Why do you think that the Supreme Court considers the freedom of speech so important? Evaluation / Assessment: Students will be evaluated on completion of journal entry, participation in class discussions, participation in mock trial, and completion of essay. Vocabulary: trampling, doctrine, rapt, intervention, intimidation, harassment, meld, statute, concede, suppress Extension Activities: 1. Learn about...
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    Grade Level: 6-12

  40.   Valuable Lessons
Overview of Lesson Plan: In this lesson, students explore how immigration, citizenship, due process of law, and the freedoms of speech and assembly have shaped American values throughout American history. Author(s): Elyse Fischer, The New York Times Learning Network Javaid Khan, The Bank Street College of Education in New York City Suggested Time Allowance: 1 hour Objectives: Students will: 1. Define "American values." 2. Examine the impact of the restriction of liberties on American va...
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    Grade Level: 6-12


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